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VIVO Updates for February 8, 2015 -- GWU and Open VIVO

George Washington University VIVO goes live! The George Washington University in Washington, DC has launched its VIVO site, GW Expert Finder.  You can find it at https://expert.gwu.edu.  Congratulations to the George Washington University team!  GW Expert Finder uses data from GW sources, as well as from ORCiD to populate faculty profiles.

Open VIVO.  At the Force16 conference in Portland Oregon, VIVO will demonstrate "Open VIVO" a hosted, open VIVO that anyone with an ORCiD can join.  Conference attendees are required to submit materials with their ORCiD identifier and post these materials in Figshare.  An Open VIVO Task Force will create a hosted VIVO, support user sign on via ORCiD, pre-load Figshare content and ORCiD content, and support real-time addition of scholarly works to a profile by providing a DOI.  A signed on user will be able to add a paper, or other DOI-identified work, to their profile by providing the DOI, and the contribution they made to the work.  Open VIVO will load the metadata for the publication from CrossRef in real-time.  GRID data will be used to identify organizations.  An extensive list of journals will be included.  Users of Open VIVO will be able to export their data at any time.  Data from RDF will be published to GitHub, on a daily basis for anyone to use.  Features and data developed for Open VIVO will be incorporated into future versions of VIVO.  The task force is looking for expertise in user interface and graphical design, and in Java development. A document describing the scope of the work can be found here.  Please consider joining the task force for Open VIVO.  Contact Mike Conlon to help!

Development Call call this Thursday. The Development Interest Group will have its call this Thursday at 1 PM Eastern US time.  Experience with Java development is recommended.  No experience with VIVO is required.  Calls discuss on-going development efforts, Maven, Selenium testing.  Contact Graham Triggs for further information.  For dates of additional upcoming VIVO calls and meetings, see the VIVO Calendar of the front page of the VIVO wiki.

Go VIVO!

Mike

Mike Conlon
VIVO Project Director

VIVO Updates for January 31, 2016

Jon Corson-Rikert retires from Cornell.  Jon Corson-Rikert, the creator of VIVO, has retired from Cornell.  It is hard for me to imagine a better colleague – thoughtful, considerate, creative, insightful, respectful, productive, and genuinely kind.  I hope you had a chance to meet Jon, to see him present, to work with him, and to share your thoughts with him.  Too often we rush through our days.  You may want to stop for a moment and recall moments you may have had with Jon and what those moments mean to you.  

I first met Jon on-line in the spring of 2009, to think through how we might apply for an NIH grant to support the development of VIVO.  The grant team gelled quickly and certainly was a good omen for the collaboration that was to come.  I met Jon in person for the first time in December of that year, in Washington DC, at the kick-off meeting of the grant.  I visited Cornell in the summer of 2010.  Jon and I had a wonderful lunch and afternoon surrounded by sunflowers in the beautiful New York countryside sharing all manner of ideas regarding the representation of scholarship and the role of VIVO in the world.  And of course our joint work and discussions continued until this past week.

Jon intends to spend time with his family and grandchildren.  And perhaps he will participate in the VIVO community in the future.  I certainly hope so and wish him and his family all the very best!

What does scholarship look like?  Scholarship, the creation, transmission, and preservation of knowledge, takes many forms.  From agriculture, to medicine, to physics, to philosophy, scholars are engaged in classrooms, laboratories, clinics, libraries, communities, on land, sea and sky, across the world.  VIVO is looking for pictures of scholarship to use on our web site.  Do you have a picture you'd like to share?  Photos must be a minimum of 1800 pixels wide, 72 dpi, and available for VIVO to use without license restrictions (CC-BY or CC-0 would be most helpful).  If you have a photo you would like us to consider using on the VIVO home page, please contact Mike Conlon.  We will, of course, give credit where credit is due.  We look forward to seeing your views of scholarship.

OpenRIF and VIVO at Force11. OpenRIF Semantic Web Infrastructure for the Scholarly Landscape, will be presented as a workshop at the Force 11 conference in Portland, Oregon, USA on Sunday, April 17, from 9-12.  If you are attending Force11, you should consider attending this workshop to learn more about OpenRIF and its work on the VIVO-ISF ontology.  Violeta IlikMelissa HaendelShahim EssaidMike Conlon, and George Chacko, from NETE will be presenting.  And if you weren't planning to attend Force11, perhaps this is reason for you to go!

Outreach and Engagement Call call this Thursday. The Outreach and Engagement Interest Group will have its call this Thursday at 1 PM Eastern US time.  No experience with VIVO is needed.  Calls discuss how to engage the university community in the use of VIVO.  All are welcome on the calls.  Contact Julia Trimmer for further information.  For dates of additional upcoming VIVO calls and meetings, see the VIVO Calendar of the front page of the VIVO wiki.

Go VIVO!

Mike

Mike Conlon
VIVO Project Director

VIVO Updates -- January 18, 2016

The VIVO Committers Group.  The VIVO project now has a committers group!  The committers are responsible for the VIVO software, committing changes to the various VIVO code repositories in accordance with the strategic plan, and the VIVO roadmap, under the governance of the VIVO Leadership Group and the VIVO Steering Group.  The Committers Group is Graham Triggs - Duraspace, Ted Lawless - Thomson Reuters, Brian J Lowe - Ontocale, Benjamin Gross - UNAVCO, Justin Littman - George Washington University, Nate Prewitt - University of Colorado Boulder, Jim Blake - Cornell, Tim Worrall - Cornell, and John Ferreira - Cornell.  Thanks to all for taking on this important role on the project.  See the Committers Group wiki page for additional information on the roles and responsibilities of the Committers Group.

Sponsoring the 7th Annual VIVO Conference.  Find out how to leverage this lively forum for the exchange of ideas on how new semantic and collaborative technologies impact research to bring your products and services to the attention of decision makers as a 2016 VIVO Conference sponsor.  See the VIVO blog for details and a sponsorship prospectus.

Relationship Diagrams updated in the VIVO wiki.  VIVO represents scholarship using graph models.  The VIVO wiki has figures of the these models for the most common scholarly activities.  Recent updates have been made to the AdvisingEducational Background, and Grantsfigures in the wiki.  The models have not changed.

Follow VIVO on social media.  Keep up with VIVO on social media.  Follow VIVO on Twitter at @vivocollab,  like us on Facebook at "VIVO: Connect, Share, Discover," join the VIVO: Connect , Share Discover group on LinkedIn.  Starting this week, VIVO Updates is cross-posted to VIVO social media.  We hope this makes it even easier to participate in VIVO.

Implementation call this Thursday. The Implementation Interest Group will have its call this Thursday at 1 PM Eastern US time.  See the Interest Group page for call details.  Implementation calls share status information regarding implementations across the world, answer questions from sites implementing VIVO, and share best practices for VIVO data acquisition, system administration, data management, and operations.  No experience with VIVO is needed.  All are welcome on the calls.  Contact Paul Albert for further information.  For dates of additional upcoming VIVO calls and meetings, see the VIVO Calendar of the front page of the VIVO wiki.

Go VIVO!

Mike

Mike Conlon

VIVO Project Director

Your Strategic Advantage: Become a Sponsor of the 7th Annual VIVO Conference

Find out how to leverage this lively forum for the exchange of ideas on how new semantic and collaborative technologies impact research to bring your products and services to the attention of decision makers as a 2016 VIVO Conference sponsor

This year, the 7th Annual VIVO Conference will be held in Denver, Colorado from August 17-19. Conference sponsors will market to and engage with conference delegates who are decision makers and influencers in higher education and research including:

  • Research Officers

  • Developers, Ontologists, and Analysts

  • Scientists and Researchers

  • Publishers

  • Funding Agencies

Conference sponsors will meet attendees who share their interests in:

  • Research Networking, Expert Finding, Research Discovery, and Social Network Analysis

  • Semantic Web and Linked Data

  • Research Data Standards and Metrics

  • Assessing Research Impact

  • Research Information Management and Current Research Information Systems (CRIS)

  • Technology, Technical Support, and Consulting for representing scholarship

Learn about the very attractive sponsorship packages at four levels of support with corresponding benefits from the VIVO Conference Sponsorship Prospectus. Don’t forget to review the list of exclusive opportunities to sponsor conference events and key features that will place your company front and center during conference proceedings.

New in 2016, the Institutional Sponsor Package gives universities, agencies and organizations opportunities to have a presence and show their support to the VIVO community. The affordable Institutional sponsorship level includes three conference registrations that can be granted as scholarships.

VIVO 2016 sponsorship opportunities are limited. Please consider early committer offers. Contact Designing Events at 410-654-5525 or vivo@designingevents.com with questions.     

Click here for the 2016 VIVO Conference Sponsorship Prospectus.

About VIVO

VIVO (http://vivoweb.org) is an open source, open ontology, open process platform for hosting information about the interests, activities and accomplishments of scientists and scholars. VIVO supports open development and integration of science and scholarship through simple, standard semantic web technologies. VIVO is a community-supported project under the DuraSpace umbrella.

How Does DuraSpace Help?

The DuraSpace (http://duraspace.org) organization is an independent 501(c)(3) not-for-profit providing leadership and innovation for open technologies that promote durable, persistent access and discovery of digital data. Our values are expressed in our organizational byline, "Committed to our digital future."

DuraSpace works collaboratively with organizations that use VIVO to advance the design, development and sustainability of the project. As a non-profit, DuraSpace provides technical leadership, sustainability planning, fundraising, community development, marketing and communications, collaborations and strategic partnerships, and administration.

 

Updated VIVO Website tells VIVO Story

Winchester, MA.  November, 18, 2015.  The VIVO Project launched a new website today (http://www.vivoweb.org) focused on telling the VIVO story, and simplifying access to all forms of information regarding VIVO.

Short videos tell the VIVO story -- how VIVO is connecting data to provide an integrated view of the scholarly work of an organization, how VIVO uses open standards to share data, and how VIVO is used to discover patterns of collaboration and work within and between organizations.

Using a clean web design, the new site minimizes navigation and provides easy access to product information and participation in the VIVO open source community.  Using a mobile-first approach, the new site displays well on phones, tablets and computers.

In addition, the new website highlights partners, project members, service providers, and provides a registry of VIVO sites.

We hope you enjoy the new site and look forward to your feedback.

NOW AVAILABLE: VIVO 1.8.1 — Improved Performance and New Visualizations

Winchester, MA On November 10, 2015 VIVO 1.8.1 was released by the VIVO team. This new release offers users vastly improved performance, new and better visualizations, as well as bug fixes.

Full release notes are available on the VIVO wiki.

Performance improvements

Users should see up to 75% reduction in time to display profiles compared to VIVO 1.8, and a 30% reduction compared to VIVO 1.7. These findings have been observed on both small data sets (200 people, 3,500 articles), and large data sets (4,500 people, 40,000 articles). Most profiles - even large/complex profiles - display within approximately two seconds.

Visualizations

The ability to examine the VIVO network from many points-of-view is at the heart of connecting researchers, ideas and resources. VIVO 1.8.1 offers users new and improved visualizations that make it easier to “see” formative research as it emerges at individual, institutional and topic levels. Click here to see an example of the new Visualizations in 1.8.1

New Javascript based versions of Co-Author and Co-Investigator are networks available. These new visualizations do not require Flash and display on mobile devices such as phones and tablets.

All visualizations have significant performance improvements. Maps of Science, Temporal Graphs and Co-author and Co-Investigator networks now all complete in just a few seconds. The very largest Maps of Science may require up to two minutes to complete.

Additional Improvements

New AltMetric badges are enabled on publications by default, providing direct link to AltMetric information regarding the publication.

Additional improvements reduce time and resource usage for indexing and inferencing. More than a dozen have been made to improve user experience.

We look forward to hearing from you about VIVO 1.8.1. Please contact VIVO Tech Lead Graham Triggs with questions, suggestions and feedback: <gtriggs@duraspace.org>.

About VIVO

VIVO is an open source, open ontology, open process platform for hosting information about the interests, activities and accomplishments of scientists and scholars. VIVO supports open development and integration of science and scholarship through simple, standard semantic web! technologies. VIVO was originally funded by Cornell University and the National Institutes of Health (U24 RR029822) and is currently a community-supported project under the DuraSpace umbrella.

How Does DuraSpace Help?

The DuraSpace organization is an independent 501(c)(3) not-for-profit providing leadership and innovation for open technologies that promote durable, persistent access and discovery of digital data. Our values are expressed in our organizational byline, "Committed to our digital future."

DuraSpace works collaboratively with organizations that use VIVO to advance the design, development and sustainability of the project. As a non-profit, DuraSpace provides technical leadership, sustainability planning, fundraising, community development, marketing and communications, collaborations and strategic partnerships, and administration.

Introducing the VIVO Community Pages

Hidden treasures are even better when they are discovered. The VIVO community wiki pages are one of those treasures. This section of the DuraSpace wiki offers the VIVO community a wealth of information, best practices and valuable resources that can assist institutions in implementing, managing and sharing VIVO data and resources. Here are highlights of what you will find in the VIVO Community pages.

 

Considering VIVO

If you are thinking about or planning a VIVO implementation you will find a concise overview of VIVO features and functionality here including FAQs, slide presentations, recordings, historic information and more.

 

Planning a VIVO Implementation

A common VIVO process question arises once a university decides to take the next step. How do institutions assess the effort and resources that will be required to implement VIVO, even though the open source software is freely available?  How long will it take; what kind of people are needed; how much does it cost; where do I start, and; is there a sample plan for implementing VIVO?  A recent task force, led by Violeta Ilik from Northwestern University, addressed these and other questions. As a result of their efforts an entirely new section of the Community VIVO wiki, Planning a VIVO Implementation has been added to the VIVO Community pages. This section describes the planning steps required to implement VIVO and includes suggestions for all aspects of the process–project management, outreach and community engagement, data management, and technical development in perspective, with sections devoted to analysis, design, implementation, launch and maintenance for each.

 

Event Calendar, Events Organized by the VIVO Community, Conferences Attended and to Attend

These three sections help you plan your participation in the active VIVO community that is working on many simultaneous fronts all at once. Tracking past and upcoming meetings and events are facilitated by these sections:

The VIVO Event Calendar is the place to check to keep up to date with community online meetings and events.

Upcoming and past face-to-face community events with links to more information can be found in Events Organized by the VIVO Community section.

External events and conferences where VIVO is planning to have a presence are summarized in Conferences Attended and to Attend.

 

Adoption Materials

Useful, printable materials and resources to help you share information about the dynamic VIVO platform and community it serves help you “make the case for VIVO” within your institution or at meetings and conferences here.

 

Email listservs

Keeping in touch with VIVO colleagues who share your interests is the subject of the Email listservs page where you will find links to information about how to join a list. The listservs focused on relevant aspects of VIVO community activity of interest may be found here.

 

Sites Implementing VIVO

"Who’'s using VIVO" is a key question for institutions who are considering adding VIVO to their software stack. This up-to-date list of 26 institutions who have production VIVO sites and 86 more that are in various stages of implementation will be of interest here.

 

Social Media

If you are interested in following recent VIVO news and community achievements as a way of keeping up with what’s going on, then check in on VIVO social media here. VIVO maintains Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn pages.

 

Branding, Logos, Templates, and Identity Guidelines

Do you need the VIVO logo for a presentation or poster you are preparing? This page has links to VIVO logos, Guidelines for their use and a Powerpoint template here.

 

Maintaining the VIVO Wiki

"Wiki gardening" or "weeding" the corpus of 1700 VIVO wiki pages is an ongoing organizational and maintenance task that the community can be particularly helpful with. Here are some guidelines if you are inspired to help make the VIVO wiki an even better community resource.

#VIVO15 conference materials now in figshare!


We are delighted to partner with figshare to make #VIVO15 presentations openly available through their new figshare for institutions service. This makes the terrific work of the VIVO community more accessible than ever in a beautiful, easy-to-use interface. Moreover, the materials are now persistent and citable with a DOI. Our sincere thanks to the figshare and Digital Science teams for their work to make this possible!

-- Kristi Holmes & Melissa Haendel, 2015 VIVO Conference Chair & Program Chair

We've invited figshare to share some information about their new figshare for institutions service and the benefits it offers to the VIVO community:

The recent launch of figshare for institutions will see the complete figshare codebase move over to a much more flexible system so that all those who use figshare can make use of new functionality such as ‘embargos’ and ‘collections’. To date, we have focused our features on keeping life simple for academics, whilst giving both the end users and the institutions complete control over their files. We have also supported publishers in their need for new infrastructure to host an ever diversifying and growing number of research outputs. The new codebase however, allows a lot more flexibility to provide solutions to any party looking to better manage and disseminate academic content.

The first of these areas is academic conferences. The figshare team was in attendance at the recent VIVO conference in Boston and took the opportunity to discuss a potential portal with Mike Conlon (VIVO Project Lead) and Kristi Holmes (VIVO15 Conference Chair). As a tribute to the high regard figshare and the entire Digital Science portfolio holds for the VIVO community, we decided to pilot using the new figshare portals as a great way to manage and expose the products of the conference. This can include abstracts, posters, presentations and even videos of the talks. Conferences are a fantastic source of academic outputs, from forward thinking abstracts to cutting edge research in posters. For the most part, this is captured on conference websites which aren’t necessarily visited much after the conference itself. By supporting the persistent storage of these outputs, conferences can have useful record of all of the outputs presented each year. As with all public figshare outputs, the files are previewable in the browser and everything is persistent and citable with a DOI.

We are continuing to collect content for the conference. If you have posters, presentations, associated with this years highly successful VIVO event that you can email them to s.porter@digital-science.com . In the meantime, you can check our progress with VIVO 2015 instance here!

Our new portal designs mean that the logo and branding can be matched up with the year’s theme of location. The portal has lots of filters so conference organisers can see which are the most popular posters and presentations, while making all of the content citable. Going forward, preserving a copy of record of the annual conference will be easy. Each year a new filter and landing page can be added so that each annual conference can have it’s own persistent record.

If you are running an academic conference and would be interested in piloting the new functionality, or if you have any other interesting use cases for our new portals, do reach out and let us know. Alternatively, If you would like to hear more about how we can satisfy funder mandates on open data, or to see how ‘figshare for institutions’ could be a good fit at your University or College, please get in touch via info@figshare.com or via twitter, facebook or google+.

Jim Blake: Dedication and Talent Marked Tenure as VIVO Software Developer

Winchester, MA

On Sept. 21, 2015 Graham Triggs took over as technical lead for the VIVO project. He took the reins from a team of talented developers that include the original VIVO developers-Jon Corson-Rikert, Brian Lowe, and Brian Caruso, many others who have contributed to VIVO as an open source project, and Jim Blake as the recent VIVO lead developer and release manager. As Jim Blake ended his official work with VIVO he paused to reflect on key accomplishments and changes during his tenure.

When Jim joined the VIVO project in 2009 as a quality control programmer it was emerging from inception and incubation at Cornell as a grant-funded enterprise. He recalls being enthusiastic about participating in a technical team that valued tasks related to ensuring that software was production-ready and easy to use.

VIVO Project Director Mike Conlon: "Jim has been steadfast in moving VIVO forward as an open and accessible software project through both coding and documentation; he has worked largely behind the scenes to improve structure and modularity, add key features such as internationalization, and encourage community involvement through patience and good humor."

Jim developed the first formal VIVO release process, related workflows and associated roles that were documented and repeatable. He wrote test scripts and established a continuous integrations server to encourage quality control. Blake appreciated being able to work on software development issues that he felt were important in order to advance community goals.

He suggests, "A major VIVO accomplishment beginning with the NIH award has been a transition away from a one-off artisanal software package to something that is more production- oriented and that can be used in a variety of settings."

Jim Blake wore several hats during his time with VIVO including that of VIVO release manager while also writing code-the equivalent of flying a plane while it's being built. He knew that he could contribute to making the code base more accessible to community developers by imposing or extracting an architecture to make whole sections replaceable. Much of Jim's documentation can be found on the VIVO wiki alongside many other community contributed documents.

In looking forward Jim said, "It's important to learn as much as possible from other open source projects while keeping in mind that VIVO project serves its own very unique community."

VIVO project colleagues, partners and friends extend heartfelt thanks to Jim Blake for his leadership, energy and vision, and wish him the best as he looks forward to the next phase of his career in library-focused information technology development.

JOIN VIVO Stories: Introducing People, Projects, Ideas and Innovation

The Telling VIVO Stories Task Force is underway! The task force goal is to grow our open source community and actively engage with its members by sharing each others stories. The first three stories are now available to inspire and answer questions about how others have implemented VIVO at their institutions:

Does this effort look interesting? Do you have a story to share? Great! We invite you to consider joining VIVO storytellers.

The Telling VIVO Stories Task Force increases interactions and builds deeper connections among community members by encouraging the development and distribution of stories about innovative VIVOs. The stories are generated from interviews conducted by members from other VIVO institutions using a simple set of questions.

Once the stories are approved they are published widely throughout the VIVO and DuraSpace communities. This growing corpus of real-world examples will make it easier for new VIVO users to learn more about how other community members went about implementing VIVO.

“Telling VIVO Stories” Task Force objectives:

  • Increase engagement of  VIVO community members through the familiar process of storytelling;
  • Develop more and deeper connections among and between VIVO community members and beyond; provide an avenue for community members to develop personal relationships;
  • Generate awareness, interest, and participation of the wider VIVO and open source community by "connecting the research dots" about the activities and accomplishments of VIVO community members and institutions in the emerging research data landscape

Please join us in sharing the energy, enthusiasm and good ideas of the VIVO community. Contact Julia Trimmer, Telling VIVO Stories Task Force chair <julia.trimmer@duke.edu >.

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